G.M. Goshgarian

From armeniapedia.org
Revision as of 14:26, 18 September 2011 by Levon (talk | contribs)
Jump to: navigation, search

University of Burgundy

G. M. Goshgarian has rendered poetry and prose by twenty-six modern Armenian writers into English: Abovian, Alishan, Andonian, Arpiarian, Balakian, Beledian, K. Emin, V. Grigorian, Hamasdegh, Indra, Kurkdjian, Mahari, Narduni, H. Oshagan, V. Oshagan, M. Petrosian, Sarafian, Shahnur, Shushanian, Srvantsdiants, Terian, Varoujan, Vorpuni, Vratsian, Yessayan, and K. Zarian. Commissioned and paid for by the Fesjian Fund at New York's Columbia University, the Armenian Department of the London School of Oriental and African Studies, the Armenian National Institute in Washington, the Prince Claus Fund, and a generous bequest left by Abraham Terzian for the still unrealized purpose of producing an encyclopedic work on Armenian history and culture, most of these translations remain unpublished, as does Goshgarian's translation of the first novel in Hagop Oshagan's novel cycle "Remnants", which was awarded a PEN translation grant in 2009. Among his few published translations from Armenian are short extracts from "Remnants", available in the journal "Ararat" and the on-line reviews "Words without Borders" and "PEN Newsletter"; selections from Mahari and Yessayan in M. Nichanian's "Writers of Disaster"; poems by K. Beledian, G. Emin and V. Grigorian, available in "Ararat" and "Deviation: Anthology of Contemporary Armenian Literature"; and an essay by V. Oshagan, released in A. Oshagan and V. Oshagan, "Father Land". A few more of Goshgarian's translations will appear in Nichanian's "Mourning Philology", to be released in 2012 or 2013.

Goshgarian has also published translations from French and German of twenty books and a number of essays, including work by Janine Altounian, Sévane Garibian, Raymond Kévorkian, Marc Nichanian, Vahé Tachjian, Louis Althusser, Jacques Derrida, Gérard Genette, Jürgen Habermas, Octave Mannoni and Hans-Jörg Rheinberger. His review article on the Turkish journalist Ece Temelkuran's "Deep Mountain: Across the Turkish-Armenian Divide" (London: Verso, 2010) may be found in the Winter 2011 issue of the on-line journal "New Politics".