Armenian Horrors Grow-nyt19150806

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Massacres Greater Than Under Abdul Hamid, London Paper Says

AUGUST 6, 1915

Special Cable To THE NEW YORK TIMES. LONDON, Friday, Aug 6. The Daily Chronicle says:

"A tragic explode of the war in the East is the wholesale massacre of the Armenians in the eastern villages of Asia Minor by the Turks and Kurds. Regarding the terrible scale of these massacres, greater than any which occurred under Abdul Hamid, there is now no room for doubt, and the statements made on the subject last week by Lord Bryce in the House of Lords were officially corroborated by Lord Crewe.

"In certain cases the Armenians have defended themselves successfully. At the town of Van, for instance, to which Enver Pasha sent his brother-in-law with a commission of extermination, the victims rose after the massacres had begun, barricaded the Armenian quarter, and held out against the Turkish siege for four weeks until relieved by the advent of the Russian army. But with this and some similar exceptions they have been powerless. Tens and probably hundreds of thousands have been butchered, and great numbers more have been deported by road hundreds of miles to Western Anatolia under conditions amounting to slow extermination.

"The Germans, who are masters of the Central Ottoman Administration, have to their everlasting shame not only permitted, but rather encouraged these horrors. The allied powers have notified the Turkish officials that they will hold them personally responsible, and at this stage they can do no more. There is perhaps room for an effective American protest, though we have not yet heard of one."

The Chronicle concludes by making an appeal to British private charity, citing the following terrible account of ruin and devastation following the Turkish massacres in Northeastern Armenia, telegraphed by Ayadian the Archbishop of Van, and Aram, the Governor of Van, to the honorary secretary of the Armenian Red Cross and Refugee Fund:

"Besides Van, the Provinces of Chatakh, Moks, Sparkert, Matertank, and Khizan are saved. The rest are ruined and devastated. Men, women, and children are massacred. Twenty thousand people are homeless. Famine and infectious disease prevail. Many volunteers are sick and wounded. Notwithstanding assistance from the Russian Government and the Armenians in the Caucasus, there is great want of doctors, drugs, ambulances, and food. The situation in Bitlis, Moush, and Diarbekir is terrible. We beg urgently for immediate help."

A hard copy of this article or hundreds of others from the time of the Armenian Genocide can be found in The Armenian Genocide: News Accounts From The American Press: 1915-1922

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