White Genocide

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White Genocide (Armenian: Ճերմակ or սպիտակ ջարդ, Jermag or Spitag Chart) is the term Western Armenians use to describe assimilation in the West [1]. Armenians were forcibly deported from their homeland in Anatolia during the Armenian Genocide in 1915-1918, and never allowed to return[2]. Western Armenians consider Armenians who assimilate within the local population of the country where they were eventually forced to emigrate (such as France, USA, Argentina, etc) as lost to their nation due to the continuing exile after the actual genocide itself, and thus consider that lost Armenian to be another victim of the genocidal attempt to eliminate the Armenians[3][4]. The term "White Genocide" was also used for the regions of Nagorno-Karabakh and Nakhichevan where Armenians were forcibly deported and cleansed from the regions. [5] [6] [7] [8]

Armenia is referred to by many in Armenia and in the diaspora as the “white genocide” (spitak chartuh). As one of my informants said, “What the Turks did not do, we are doing to ourselves by fleeing the homeland.” [9]

References

  1. Encyclopedia of Genocide - IW Charny
  2. Nations Abroad: diaspora politics and international relations in the Former Soviet Union - Page 96 by Neil J. Melvin, Charles King
  3. Survivors: An Oral History Of The Armenian Genocide - Page 166 by Donald Eugene Miller, Lorna Touryan Miller
  4. Diaspora, Identity and Religion: new directions in theory and research - Page 72 by Waltraud Kokot
  5. "Gha-Ra-Bagh": The Emergence of the National Democratic Movement in Armenia - Page 56 by Mark Malkasian
  6. Modern Hatreds: The Symbolic Politics of Ethnic War - Page 55 by Stuart J. Kaufman
  7. Limiting Institutions?: the challenge of Eurasian security governance - Page 51 by James Sperling, S. Victor Papacosma
  8. Perilous States: conversations on culture, politics, and nation - Page 109 by George E. Marcus
  9. Between Tragedy and Reality A Ishkanian

See also

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