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Difference between revisions of "Tbilisi"

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Early history
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Tbilisi (Georgian თბილისი, Armenian Թիֆլիս ''Tiflis'') — is the capital city of the country [[Georgia]].
According to an old legend, the present-day territory of Tbilisi was covered by forests as late as the 5th century A.D. One widely accepted variant of the legend of Tbilisi's founding states that King Vakhtang I Gorgasali of Georgia went hunting in the heavily wooded region with a falcon (sometimes the falcon is either substituted by a hawk or other small birds of prey in the legend). The King's falcon allegedly caught/injured a pheasant during the hunt, after which both birds fell into a nearby hot spring and died (from the burns received in the hot water). King Vakhtang became so impressed with the hot springs that he decided to cut down the forest and build a city on the location. The name Tbilisi derives from the Old Georgian word "Tpili", meaning warm. The name Tbili or Tbilisi ("warm location") therefore was given to the city because of the area's numerous sulfuric hot springs that came out of the ground.
 
  
Archaeological studies of the region have revealed that the territory of Tbilisi was settled by humans as early as the 4th millennium B.C. The earliest actual (recorded) accounts of settlement of the location come from the second half of the 4th century A.D, when a fortress was built during King Varaz-Bakur's reign. Towards the end of the 4th century the fortress fell into the hands of the Persians after which the location fell back into the hands of the Kings of Kartli (Georgia) by the middle of the 5th century A.D. King Vakhtang I Gorgasali (reigned in the middle and latter halves of the 5th century) who is largely credited for founding Tbilisi was actually responsible for reviving and building up the city and not founding it. The present-day location of the area which Gorgasali seems to have built up is spread out around the Metekhi Square (Abanot-Ubani historical district).
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The Armenian history and contribution to the city of Tbilisi is very significant. After the Russian conquest of the area, Armenians fleeing persecution in the Ottoman Empire and Persia caused a jump in the Armenian population, until it reached about 40% of the city total.  Many of the mayors and business class were Armenian, and much of the old city was built by Armenians. Until recently the neighborhoods of Havlabar and the area across the river were very heavily Armenian, but that has changed a great deal in the last two decades.
  
Tbilisi becomes a capital
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==Armenian sites==
King Dachi I Ujarmeli (beginning of the 6th century A.D.), who was the successor of Vakhtang I Gorgasali, moved the capital from Mtskheta to Tbilisi according to the will left by his father. It must be mentioned that Tbilisi was not the capital of a unified Georgian state at that time (therefore did not include the territory of Colchis) and was only the capital of Eastern Georgia/Iberia. During his reign, King Ujarmeli was also responsible for finishing the construction of the fortress wall that lined the city's new boundaries. Beginning from the 6th century, Tbilisi started to grow at a steady pace due to the region's favorable and strategic location which placed the city along important trade and travel routes between Europe and Asia.
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There are still two working Armenian Churches in the city, and an Armenian Theatre. The Armenian "Pantheon", where prominent Armenians are buried has the tombs of some of Armenia's most loved personalities ever, including [[Raffi]] and [[Hovhannes Tumanian]].
  
Foreign domination
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A number of Armenian churches have been confiscated by the Georgian State/Church as documented by the United States [[State Department]]: "The Roman Catholic and Armenian Apostolic Churches have been unable to secure the return of churches and other facilities closed during the Soviet period, many of which later were given to the Georgian Orthodox Church by the State. The prominent Armenian church in Tbilisi, Norashen, remained closed, as did four other smaller Armenian churches in Tbilisi and one in Akhaltsikhe. In addition, the Roman Catholic and Armenian Apostolic Churches, as with Protestant denominations, have had difficulty obtaining permission to construct new churches due to pressure from the GOC." [http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/irf/2005/51553.htm April 7, 2005]
Tbilisi's favorable and strategic location did not necessarily bode well for its existence as Eastern Georgia's/Iberia's capital. Located strategically in the heart of the Caucasus between Europe and Asia, Tbilisi became an object of rivalry between the region's various powers such as Persia, The Byzantine Empire, Arabia, and the Seljuk Turks. The cultural development of the city was therefore heavily dependent on who ruled the city at various times. Even though Tbilisi (and Eastern Georgia in general) was able to maintain a certain degree of autonomy from its conquerors, the foreign domination of the city began in the latter half of the 6th century and lasted well into the 10th century A.D.
 
  
From 570-580 A.D., the Persians took over Tbilisi and ruled it for about a decade. In the year 627 A.D., Tbilisi was sacked by the Byzantine/Khazar armies and later from 736-738, Arab armies entered the town under Marwan II Ibn-Muhammad. After this point, the Arabs established an emirate in Tbilisi. It must be noted that the Arab domination brought a certain order to the region and introduced a more formal/modernized judicial system into Georgia. In 764, Tbilisi was once again sacked by the Khazars, which was still under Arab control. In the year 853 A.D., the armies of Arab leader Bugha Turk (Bugha the Turk) invaded Tbilisi in order to establish a Caliphate. The Arab domination of Tbilisi continued until about 1050 A.D, due to the fact that local Georgians were unsuccessful in their drive to expel the Arabs. In 1068, the city was once again sacked, only this time by the Seljuk Turks under Sultan Alp Arslan.
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===Diocese Church in Tbilisi===
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This church is where the primate of Tbilisi has his offices. Near the baths, under the fortress. In front of the church is the tomb of the famous bard, [[Sayat Nova]].
  
[edit] Tbilisi as the capital of a unified Georgian state and the Georgian Renaissance
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<center><gallery>
In 1122, after heavy fighting with the Seljuks that involved at least 60,000 Georgians and up to 300,000 Turks, the troops of the King of Georgia David the Builder entered Tbilisi. After the battles for Tbilisi concluded, David moved his residence from Kutaisi (Western Georgia) to Tbilisi, making it the capital of a unified Georgian State. From 12-13th centuries, Tbilisi became a dominant regional power with a thriving economy (with well-developed trade and skilled labour) and a well-established social system/structure. By the end of the 12th century (A.D.), the population of Tbilisi had reached 80,000. The city also became an important literary and a cultural center not only for Georgia but for the larger civilized world as well. During Queen Tamar's reign, Shota Rustaveli worked in Tbilisi while writing his legendary epic poem, The Knight in the Panther's Skin. This period is widely known as "Georgia's Golden Age" or the Georgian Renaissance.
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Image:Tiflis-diocese-IMG_0523.JPG|Diocese Church
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Image:Tiflis-Diocese-church-CIMG3872.JPG|Diocese Church altar
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Image:Tiflis_sayat_nova-IMG_0516.JPG|Tomb of Sayat Nova
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</gallery></center>
  
[edit] Mongol domination and the following period of instability
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===Ejmiatsin Church in Tbilisi===
Tbilisi, ca. 1890-1900Tbilisi's "Golden Age" did not last for more than a century. In 1236 A.D., after suffering crushing defeats to the Mongols, Georgia came under Mongol domination. The nation itself maintained a form of semi-independence and did not lose its statehood, but Tbilisi was strongly influenced by the Mongols for the next century both politically and culturally. In the 1320s, the Mongols were forcefully expelled from Georgia and Tbilisi became the capital of an independent Georgian state once again. An outbreak of the plague struck the city in 1366.
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[[Image:Tiflis_ejmiatsin-IMG_0551.JPG|thumb|200px|Ejmiatsin of Tiflis]]
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(not to be confused with the main Ejmiatsin Church in Armenia)
  
From the late 14th until the end of the 18th century, Tbilisi came under the rule of various foreign invaders once again and on several occasions was completely burnt to the ground. In 1386, Tbilisi was invaded by the armies of Tamerlane (Timur). In 1444, the city was invaded and destroyed by Jahan Shah (the Shah of the town of Tabriz in Persia). From 1477 to 1478 the city was held by the Ak Koyunlu tribesmen of Uzun Hassan. In 1522 A.D., Tbilisi came under Persian control but was later freed in 1524 by King David X of Georgia. During this period, many parts of Tbilisi were reconstructed and rebuilt. From the 17-18th centuries, Tbilisi once again became the object of rivalry only this time between the Ottoman Turks and Persia. King Erekle of Georgia tried on several occasions, successfully, to free Tbilisi from Persian rule but in the end Tbilisi was burnt to the ground in 1795 by Shah Agha-Mohammad Khan. At this point, sensing that Georgia could not hold up against Persia alone, Erekle sought the help of Russia.
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In Havlabar, this church is undergoing renovation and reconstruction thanks to the [[Armenia Fund]].
  
Tbilisi under Russian control
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===Norashen Church in Tbilisi===
In 1801, after the Georgian kingdom of Kartl-Kakheti joined the Russian Empire, Tbilisi became the center of the Tbilisi Governance (Gubernia). From the beginning of the 19th century Tbilisi started to grow economically and politically. New buildings mainly of European style were erected throughout the town. New roads and railroads were built to connect Tbilisi to other important cities in Russia and other parts of the Transcaucasus (locally) such as Batumi, Poti, Baku, and Yerevan. By the 1850s Tbilisi once again emerged as a major trade and a cultural center. The likes of Ilia Chavchavadze, Akaki Tsereteli, Iakob Gogebashvili, Alexander Griboedov and many other statesmen, poets, and artists all found their home in Tbilisi.
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''see [[Norashen Church]] article for more information''
  
The city was visited on numerous occasions by and was the object of affection of Alexander Pushkin, Leo Tolstoy, Mikhail Lermontov, the Romanov Family and others. The Romanov Family established their residence (in Transcaucasia) on Golovin Street (Present-day Rustaveli Avenue).
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Norashen Church is located on Leselidze Street, flanked on the left by a Greek church, now transformed into a Georgian orthodox one, on the right by the Georgian Church Sioni and a few more meters further down the synagogue the mosque.  
  
Throughout the century, the political, economic and cultural role of Tbilisi with its ethnic, confessional and cultural diversity was significant not only for Georgia but for the whole Caucasus. Hence, Tbilisi took on a different look. It acquired different architectural monuments and the attributes of an international city, as well as its own urban folklore and language, and the specific Tbilisuri (literally, belonging to Tbilisi) culture.
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Norashen was founded in 1467 and renovated in 1650 by Nazar. At this time, the great cupola was rebuilt by Master Petros. A series of renovations followed in 1795, 1808 and in 1875. The Lidatamashian and Vartanov families and Katarina Pridonian are buried next to the Church. During the Soviet era, the church was transformed into an archive.
  
After the Russian Revolution of 1917, Tbilisi became the capital of an independent Georgia.
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There is a 17 year old conflict relating to Norashen Church, one of the Armenian churches in Tbilisi.  A Georgian priest has been waging a destructive campaign to erase any evidence of the church having been Armenian and negotiations over the fate of the church continue. The Archbishops Garegin and Grigoris came from Armenia to Tbilisi, where they met with Iliad II, the Georgian Patriarch and it was decided to stop all actions until the advent of better times. The church has been closed since.
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<center><gallery>
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Image:Tiflis norashen-IMG 0478.JPG|Norashen Church
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Image:Tiflis norashen-IMG 0481.JPG|Norashen Church
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Image:Tiflis norashen-IMG 0493.JPG|Norashen Church
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Image:Tiflis_norashen-IMG_0502.JPG|Norashen Church
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</gallery></center>
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===Belltower===
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[[Image:Tiflis belltower-IMG 0388.JPG|thumb|150px|Belltower of destroyed Armenian Church]]
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This belltower is all that is left of what was once a large Armenian church, which was demolished by the Soviet Georgian government.
 +
 
 +
===S. Gevorg of Mughni Church in Tbilisi===
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[[Image:Tiflis-gevorg of mughni-IMG 0411.JPG|thumb|200px|S. Gevorg of Mughni]]
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This Armenian church with a tin roof and blue glazed crosses is under the control of the Georgian church and is about to crumble (as of November, 2006).
 +
 
 +
===S. Astvatsatsin Church of Bethlehem in Tbilisi===
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This church has been restored as a Georgian Orthodox Church.  Has an Armenian inscription on the side. 
 +
 
 +
===S. Stepanos Convent in Tbilisi===
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The crypt/tomb of a wealthy Armenian benfactor has been destroyed.
 +
 
 +
===Karap S. Gevorg Church of Tbilisi===
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Small Armenian Church now being used as a Georgian Church.  Karap is the name of the neighborhood, meaning Stoneside (Kar-ap, the neighborhood abuts stone mountainside).
 +
 
 +
===S. Nshan Church of Tbilisi===
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[[Image:Tiflis nshan-IMG 0394.JPG|thumb|200px|S. Nshan Church]]
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This Armenian Church of 1701 has green roof tiles and blue crosses on the side.  It is in very critical condition.  It was filled with books, but a fire burned them and the floor is still littered with the remains.  The Armenian Church is still not allowed to use this property.  Many Armenian inscriptions, graves and some khachkars remain.  Most of the graves outside have been swallowed up by the garages of neighboring houses.
 +
 
 +
===S. Minas Basilica of Tblisi===
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Small old basilica in Havlabar which may have been Armenian.  Was used as a small production/factory space during Soviet times, thus the green and white interior paint.
 +
 
 +
===S. Marine Church of Tbilisi===
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Small old church in Havlabar which may have been Armenian.
 +
 
 +
===Karmir Avetaran Church of Tbilisi===
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Massive Armenian church located in Havlabar, 1 block from the metro (away from the new Georgian Cathedral).  Numerous Armenian inscriptions.  Said to have been blown up in 1989 by Georgian nationalists.
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 +
===Petros Adamian Tbilisi State Armenian Drama Theatre===
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[[Image:Tiflis-armenian theatre-IMG 0561.JPG|thumb|200px|Bedros Atamian Armenian Theatre]]
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Petros Adamian Tbilisi State Armenian Drama Theatre was established in [[1858]] by the great Armenian theatre figure Gevork Chmshkian. The first staging was "Adji Souleyman" performance. From 1922 through 1936 before building of the new current theatre building the theatres name was "Artistic theatre". In 1936 was built a new theatre building which was named Stepan Shahumian Armenian Theatre. The first performance was Mkrtich Djanan's performance "Shakh Nane". On this stage was grown a number generations of the great Armenian actors.Here were worked the world's famous actors: Petros Adamian, Siranoush,Vagram Papazian, Oganes Abelian, and also our outstanding actors: Olga Maysourian, Isaak Alikhanian, Mariamik Mochorian, Artem and Mary Beroians, Artem Lousinian, Babken Nersesian, Dory Amirbekian, Ashot Kadjvorian, Emma Stepanian, Armenian directors: Arshak Bourdjalian, Levon Kalantar, Stepanos Kapanakian, Alexander Abarian, Ferdinand Bzhikian, Hayk Umikian, Mikael Grigorian, Oganes Karapetian, Romen Chaltikian, Roma Matiashvili, Robert Egian. Music for theatres often was written by Aram Khachatourian, Armen Tigranian, Alexander Spendiarian, Gourgen Shakhbazian and others.
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 +
Nowadays Petros Adamian Tbilisi State Armenian Drama Theatre is the main spiritual and public center of Georgian-Armenian community and it continues the work of the great predecessors. (Source: http://amtheater.gq.nu )
 +
 
 +
===Khojavank===
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The large Armenian cemetary of Khojavank was destroyed in order to build Tbilisi's huge new Georgian cathedral.  It was done against the wishes of the Armenian community, leaving only one small, far removed section where some of the most famous Armenians in history are buried.
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 +
===Armenian Pantheon of Tbilisi===
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[[Image:Tiflis-Panteon-CIMG4094.JPG|thumb|200px|Armenian Pantheon of Tbilisi]]
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Adjacent to the huge new Georgian cathedral, but very hard to access (you must go past it, then back over a bridge, near the big antenna).  The [[Armenian Pantheon of Tbilisi]] has the tombs of many famous Armenians including [[Hovhannes Tumanian]] and [[Raffi]].  Most of the tombstones were removed in 2002 and replaced with uniform black squares with names and dates.
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===Freedom Square===
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[[Image:Tiflis-erevan_square-IMG_0609.JPG|thumb|200px|Freedom Square]]
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Once formally known as Paskevich Yerevanski Square, then Lenin Square, it was commonly called Yerevan Square.  Paskevich Erevanski (pronounced Yerevanski) was a Russian general and was called Paskevich of Yerevan in honor of his taking of Yerevan for the Russian Empire.  Abutting the north side of Freedom Square is a small open space with a fountain.  Buried between the bust of Pushkin and the fountain is Kamo ([[Simon Ter-Petrosyan]]).  Kamo was once a celebrated communist, but now his grave has been paved over and is unmarked.
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===Armenian Street Names===
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The heavily Armenian old neighborhoods of Tbilisi still have many Armenian street names, though some have been changed over time.  Leselidze Street was once called Armenian Bazaar Street.
 +
 
 +
==Genocide==
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In February 2005 the Diocese of the Armenian Apostolic Holy Church in Georgia initialized erecting a [[khachkar]] (cross-stone memorial) in Tbilisi in memory of the victims of the [[Armenian Genocide]]. Armenian Cooperation Centre of Georgia supported that initiation with gathering of necessary funds and organizing preparation of the monument. By February 2006 the monument is technically ready to be erected, but the Diocese still didn't receive the answer to its request.
 +
Thousands of genocide refugees were resided in various parts of Georgia after 1915.
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 +
==Getting there==
 +
Marshutni service to Tbilisi departs [[Yerevan]] from the Kilikia Bus Station at 8, 9, 10 and 11am.  Cost is 6,500 AMD (as of November, 2006).  Marshutnis also depart from Vanadzor, Gyumri and Artik.
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 +
==See also==
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*[[Havlabar: A Little Armenia on the Hill]]
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[[Image:204tiflis1914.gif|frame|center|Map of Tbilisi in 1914. © [http://www.armenica.org Armenica.org]]]

Revision as of 18:59, 19 December 2006

Tbilisi (Georgian თბილისი, Armenian Թիֆլիս Tiflis) — is the capital city of the country Georgia.

The Armenian history and contribution to the city of Tbilisi is very significant. After the Russian conquest of the area, Armenians fleeing persecution in the Ottoman Empire and Persia caused a jump in the Armenian population, until it reached about 40% of the city total. Many of the mayors and business class were Armenian, and much of the old city was built by Armenians. Until recently the neighborhoods of Havlabar and the area across the river were very heavily Armenian, but that has changed a great deal in the last two decades.

Armenian sites

There are still two working Armenian Churches in the city, and an Armenian Theatre. The Armenian "Pantheon", where prominent Armenians are buried has the tombs of some of Armenia's most loved personalities ever, including Raffi and Hovhannes Tumanian.

A number of Armenian churches have been confiscated by the Georgian State/Church as documented by the United States State Department: "The Roman Catholic and Armenian Apostolic Churches have been unable to secure the return of churches and other facilities closed during the Soviet period, many of which later were given to the Georgian Orthodox Church by the State. The prominent Armenian church in Tbilisi, Norashen, remained closed, as did four other smaller Armenian churches in Tbilisi and one in Akhaltsikhe. In addition, the Roman Catholic and Armenian Apostolic Churches, as with Protestant denominations, have had difficulty obtaining permission to construct new churches due to pressure from the GOC." April 7, 2005

Diocese Church in Tbilisi

This church is where the primate of Tbilisi has his offices. Near the baths, under the fortress. In front of the church is the tomb of the famous bard, Sayat Nova.

Ejmiatsin Church in Tbilisi

Ejmiatsin of Tiflis

(not to be confused with the main Ejmiatsin Church in Armenia)

In Havlabar, this church is undergoing renovation and reconstruction thanks to the Armenia Fund.

Norashen Church in Tbilisi

see Norashen Church article for more information

Norashen Church is located on Leselidze Street, flanked on the left by a Greek church, now transformed into a Georgian orthodox one, on the right by the Georgian Church Sioni and a few more meters further down the synagogue the mosque.

Norashen was founded in 1467 and renovated in 1650 by Nazar. At this time, the great cupola was rebuilt by Master Petros. A series of renovations followed in 1795, 1808 and in 1875. The Lidatamashian and Vartanov families and Katarina Pridonian are buried next to the Church. During the Soviet era, the church was transformed into an archive.

There is a 17 year old conflict relating to Norashen Church, one of the Armenian churches in Tbilisi. A Georgian priest has been waging a destructive campaign to erase any evidence of the church having been Armenian and negotiations over the fate of the church continue. The Archbishops Garegin and Grigoris came from Armenia to Tbilisi, where they met with Iliad II, the Georgian Patriarch and it was decided to stop all actions until the advent of better times. The church has been closed since.

Belltower

Belltower of destroyed Armenian Church

This belltower is all that is left of what was once a large Armenian church, which was demolished by the Soviet Georgian government.

S. Gevorg of Mughni Church in Tbilisi

S. Gevorg of Mughni

This Armenian church with a tin roof and blue glazed crosses is under the control of the Georgian church and is about to crumble (as of November, 2006).

S. Astvatsatsin Church of Bethlehem in Tbilisi

This church has been restored as a Georgian Orthodox Church. Has an Armenian inscription on the side.

S. Stepanos Convent in Tbilisi

The crypt/tomb of a wealthy Armenian benfactor has been destroyed.

Karap S. Gevorg Church of Tbilisi

Small Armenian Church now being used as a Georgian Church. Karap is the name of the neighborhood, meaning Stoneside (Kar-ap, the neighborhood abuts stone mountainside).

S. Nshan Church of Tbilisi

S. Nshan Church

This Armenian Church of 1701 has green roof tiles and blue crosses on the side. It is in very critical condition. It was filled with books, but a fire burned them and the floor is still littered with the remains. The Armenian Church is still not allowed to use this property. Many Armenian inscriptions, graves and some khachkars remain. Most of the graves outside have been swallowed up by the garages of neighboring houses.

S. Minas Basilica of Tblisi

Small old basilica in Havlabar which may have been Armenian. Was used as a small production/factory space during Soviet times, thus the green and white interior paint.

S. Marine Church of Tbilisi

Small old church in Havlabar which may have been Armenian.

Karmir Avetaran Church of Tbilisi

Massive Armenian church located in Havlabar, 1 block from the metro (away from the new Georgian Cathedral). Numerous Armenian inscriptions. Said to have been blown up in 1989 by Georgian nationalists.

Petros Adamian Tbilisi State Armenian Drama Theatre

Bedros Atamian Armenian Theatre

Petros Adamian Tbilisi State Armenian Drama Theatre was established in 1858 by the great Armenian theatre figure Gevork Chmshkian. The first staging was "Adji Souleyman" performance. From 1922 through 1936 before building of the new current theatre building the theatres name was "Artistic theatre". In 1936 was built a new theatre building which was named Stepan Shahumian Armenian Theatre. The first performance was Mkrtich Djanan's performance "Shakh Nane". On this stage was grown a number generations of the great Armenian actors.Here were worked the world's famous actors: Petros Adamian, Siranoush,Vagram Papazian, Oganes Abelian, and also our outstanding actors: Olga Maysourian, Isaak Alikhanian, Mariamik Mochorian, Artem and Mary Beroians, Artem Lousinian, Babken Nersesian, Dory Amirbekian, Ashot Kadjvorian, Emma Stepanian, Armenian directors: Arshak Bourdjalian, Levon Kalantar, Stepanos Kapanakian, Alexander Abarian, Ferdinand Bzhikian, Hayk Umikian, Mikael Grigorian, Oganes Karapetian, Romen Chaltikian, Roma Matiashvili, Robert Egian. Music for theatres often was written by Aram Khachatourian, Armen Tigranian, Alexander Spendiarian, Gourgen Shakhbazian and others.

Nowadays Petros Adamian Tbilisi State Armenian Drama Theatre is the main spiritual and public center of Georgian-Armenian community and it continues the work of the great predecessors. (Source: http://amtheater.gq.nu )

Khojavank

The large Armenian cemetary of Khojavank was destroyed in order to build Tbilisi's huge new Georgian cathedral. It was done against the wishes of the Armenian community, leaving only one small, far removed section where some of the most famous Armenians in history are buried.

Armenian Pantheon of Tbilisi

Armenian Pantheon of Tbilisi

Adjacent to the huge new Georgian cathedral, but very hard to access (you must go past it, then back over a bridge, near the big antenna). The Armenian Pantheon of Tbilisi has the tombs of many famous Armenians including Hovhannes Tumanian and Raffi. Most of the tombstones were removed in 2002 and replaced with uniform black squares with names and dates.

Freedom Square

Freedom Square

Once formally known as Paskevich Yerevanski Square, then Lenin Square, it was commonly called Yerevan Square. Paskevich Erevanski (pronounced Yerevanski) was a Russian general and was called Paskevich of Yerevan in honor of his taking of Yerevan for the Russian Empire. Abutting the north side of Freedom Square is a small open space with a fountain. Buried between the bust of Pushkin and the fountain is Kamo (Simon Ter-Petrosyan). Kamo was once a celebrated communist, but now his grave has been paved over and is unmarked.

Armenian Street Names

The heavily Armenian old neighborhoods of Tbilisi still have many Armenian street names, though some have been changed over time. Leselidze Street was once called Armenian Bazaar Street.

Genocide

In February 2005 the Diocese of the Armenian Apostolic Holy Church in Georgia initialized erecting a khachkar (cross-stone memorial) in Tbilisi in memory of the victims of the Armenian Genocide. Armenian Cooperation Centre of Georgia supported that initiation with gathering of necessary funds and organizing preparation of the monument. By February 2006 the monument is technically ready to be erected, but the Diocese still didn't receive the answer to its request. Thousands of genocide refugees were resided in various parts of Georgia after 1915.

Getting there

Marshutni service to Tbilisi departs Yerevan from the Kilikia Bus Station at 8, 9, 10 and 11am. Cost is 6,500 AMD (as of November, 2006). Marshutnis also depart from Vanadzor, Gyumri and Artik.

See also

Map of Tbilisi in 1914. © Armenica.org