Difference between revisions of "Ivan Aivazovsky"

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[[Image:Aivazovsky.jpg|260px|thumb|Portrait of Ivan Aivazovsky by Alexey Tyranov]]
 
[[Image:Aivazovsky.jpg|260px|thumb|Portrait of Ivan Aivazovsky by Alexey Tyranov]]
  
Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky (July 29, 1817 - May 5, 1900) was a [[Russia]]n-[[Armenia]]n painter.
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Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky (July 29, 1817 - May 5, 1900) (Russian: Иван Константинович Айвазовский, Armenian: Հովհաննես Այվազովսկի - Hovhannes Aivazovsky July 29, 1817 - May 5, 1900) was a Russian painter of Armenian descent, most famous for his seascapes, which constitute more than half of his paintings.
  
Born in the town of Feodosiya, Crimea, he spent his childhood in poverty. His talent as an artist earned him sponsorship and entry to the Simpheropol gymnasium and later the [[St. Petersburg]] Academy of arts.
+
Born in the town of Feodosiya, Crimea, he spent his childhood in poverty. His talent as an artist earned him sponsorship and entry to the Simpheropol gymnasium and later the [[St. Petersburg]] Academy of Arts, where he graduated with the gold medal. In 1838 he was sent to the Crimea for two years for independent study where he painted the beautiful works ''Seashore and Moon over Gurzuf''. In 1840 he went abroad, returning only in 1844. He was accorded the title of academician and tasked with painting all the major Russian military ports on the Baltic Sea. In the 1840s during his stay in Italy Aivazovsky's painting gained its own individual style, and by 1850 his art was fully mature.
  
Earning awards for his early landscapes and seascapes, he went on to paint a series of portraits of Crimean coastal towns before travelling throughout Europe. In later life, his paintings of naval scenes earned him a longstanding commission from the Russian Navy.
+
In later life, his paintings of naval scenes earned him a longstanding commission from the Russian Navy. He was also commissioned by the Ottoman Sultan to paint various artworks which are still hang in Turkish museums. His work also hangs in the most renowned museums throughout the world, including New York's Metropolitan Museum and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg.
[[Image:Aivazovsky-CIMG3488.JPG|thumb|250px|left|Ivan Aivazovsky Statue in [[Yerevan]].]]
 
With funds earned during his successful career as an artist he opened an art school and gallery in his home town of Feodosiya. He left over 6000 works at his death in 1900.
 
  
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His parents family name was Aivazian. Some of artist's paintings bear a signature, in Armenian letters, "Hovhannes Aivazian" (Russian: Ованес Айвазян).
(combine with text above)
 
  
Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky (Russian: Иван Константинович Айвазовский, Armenian: Հովհաննես Այվազովսկի - Hovhannes Aivazovsky July 29, 1817 - May 5, 1900) was a Russian painter of Armenian descent, most famous for his seascapes, which constitute more than half of his paintings.
+
[[Image:Aivazovsky-CIMG3488.JPG|thumb|250px|left|Ivan Aivazovsky Statue in [[Yerevan]].]]
 
 
Aivazovsky was born in the town of Feodosiya, Crimea, to a poor Armenian family. His parents family name was Aivazian. Some of artist's paintings bear a signature, in Armenian letters, "Hovhannes Aivazian" (Russian: Ованес Айвазян). His talent as an artist earned him sponsorship and entry to the Simferopol gymnasium and later the St.Petersburg Academy of Arts, which he graduated with the gold medal.
 
  
Earning awards for his early landscapes and seascapes, he went on to paint a series of portraits of Crimean coastal towns before travelling throughout Europe. In later life, his paintings of naval scenes earned him a longstanding commission from the Russian Navy. He also painted some artworks for the Ottoman Sultan which are currently in Turkish museums.
+
With funds earned during his successful career as an artist he opened an art school and gallery in his home town of Feodosiya. Aivazovsky himself was accomplished in many areas, played the violin, was an architect, and dabbled in archeology.
  
Due to his long life in art, Aivazovsky became the most prolific Russian painter of his day. He left over 6000 works at his death in 1900. With funds earned during his successful career as an artist he opened an art school and gallery in his home town of Feodosiya.
+
Aivazovsky also spent some time working in the Caucasus, sailing to the shores of Asia, visiting Egypt during the opening of the Suez Canal and near the end of his life, in 1892, Aivazovsky even traveled to America, where he visited Washington, DC, and Niagara Falls. He has produced paintings from all of these trips, including a famous painting of Niagara Falls that hangs in his Teodosia galley.
  
Aivazovsky's works have been auctioned for as much as 2,125,000 $, and his international reputation continues to grow. He is also said to be the most forged of all Russian painters.  
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Due to his long life in art, Aivazovsky became the most prolific Russian painter of his day and he left over 6000 works at his death in 1900. He is reputed to be a favorite among forgers.
  
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Recently, ''nouveau riche'' Russians and Armenians (particularly Russian Armenians) have began to buy back many Russian paintings that ended up in the West after the 1917 Communist revolution, including works by Aivazovsky. In London's 2004 fall auction season several Aivazovsky works rated among the 10 highest sales of the week at both Sotheby's and Christie's. One of them "St Isaac on a frosty
Agence France Presse -- English
+
day" fetched a record 1.1 million pounds (2.1 million dollars or 1.6 million euros).
December 3, 2004 Friday 4:38 PM GMT
 
 
Russians buy back national treasures that went West
 
 
LONDON
 
 
In a string of London auctions culminating on Friday, newly rich
 
Russians have spent millions of dollars buying back Russian paintings
 
and other treasures which ended up in the West both before and after
 
the 1917 Communist revolution.
 
 
....
 
 
Though Russians were the main buyers, there were others who had a
 
strong interest in the art.
 
 
An ethnic Armenian collector from New York bought a painting by Ivan
 
Konstantinovich Aivazovsky, who lived from 1817-1900 and painted many
 
maritime scenes.
 
 
"I go everywhere to buy him (Aivazovsky). I've been collecting him
 
for 25 years, but prices have gone up 10 fold compared to six years
 
ago," said the 49-year-old collector who asked not to be named.
 
 
   
 
   
"Russians and Armenians are getting rich everywhere. They love him
+
On May 1, 2003, a 3.5 m tall bronze statue of Ayvazovsky was unveiled near the Yerevan chamber music hall in the Armenian capital. Created by the sculptor Yuri Petrosyan, the maquette was originally the winner of a competition that took place in 1987 to create a public work, but the commission was sidelined when there was not enough money to complete the work. The 2003 monument was funded through the patronage of the President of Armenia's "Prometheus" Company Senik Gevorgian.
and they can spend more money," he added.
 
 
Several Aivazovsky works rated among the 10 highest sales of the week
 
at both Sotheby's and Christie's. One of them "St Isaac on a frosty
 
day" fetched a record 1.1 million pounds (2.1 million dollars or 1.6
 
million euros).
 
 
"I also bought a Faberge (the court jeweller to the Russian royal
 
family) dinner set. I had no intention to buy it, but my wife liked
 
it," he said.
 
 
....
 
 
 
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RUSSIAN TURN-OF-CENTURY PAINTINGS TO BE PUT UP FOR SALE AT SOTHEBY'S
 
 
 
RIA Novosti
 
20/04/2005
 
 
 
MOSCOW, April 20 (RIA Novosti) - Sotheby's holds an important auction
 
in New York tomorrow, with Russian classical paintings of the late
 
19th and early 20th centuries up for sale, Novye Izvestia daily
 
reports.
 
 
 
At Christie's December 2004 auction in London, Ivan Aivazovsky's
 
painting "St. Isaac's Cathedral on a Frosty Day" went off for as much
 
as 1.125 million pounds (equivalent to about 2 million dollars).
 
 
 
...
 
 
 
Alongside paintings, tomorrow's auction in NYC will also feature
 
several decorative items, including Faberges.
 
 
 
Konstantin Makovsky's four-meter oil-on-canvas painting "The Judgement
 
of Paris" may fetch a record-high price. It shows three ancient
 
deities vying for the right to be called the premier beauty.  This
 
picture was exhibited at the World Expo in Paris in 1889, and earned
 
Makovsky a gold medal and the Legion d'Honneur. The initial price is
 
1.1 million dollars. Sotheby's hopes to sell the canvas off at a
 
double of that, thus breaking Aivazovsky's record.
 
 
 
The famous Russian seascapist will again be in the spotlight
 
tomorrow. Seven of his paintings will be offered for sale at the New
 
York auction.
 
 
 
...
 
 
 
http://en.rian.ru/culture/20050420/39712876.html
 
 
 
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A 3.5 m tall bronze statue of the great marinist Hovhannes Ayvazovsky
 
was opened on May 1st near the Yeervan chamber music hall
 
 
 
ArmTV
 
May 2 2003
 
 
 
A 3.5 m tall bronze statue of the great marinist Hovhannes Ayvazovsky
 
was opened on May 1st near the Yeervan chamber music hall. Firmly
 
standing in the waves of a stormy sea, in a selfless element, the great
 
Armenian marinist creates his new canvas. This is the way sculptor Yuri
 
Petrosyan depicted Hovhannes Ayvazovsky. It is noteworthy that during
 
a competition that took place in 1987, the statue's model won the
 
first prize, but due to absence of financing the model didn't become
 
a full-scale work. For erecting the statue of the great Armenian
 
painter in Yerevan's center today, the art appreciators should be
 
grateful to the president of the "Prometheus" Company Senik Gevorgian.
 
 
 
{{copy}}
 
  
 
[[Category:Armenian Individuals|Aivazovsky, Ivan]]
 
[[Category:Armenian Individuals|Aivazovsky, Ivan]]

Revision as of 17:53, 11 February 2007

Portrait of Ivan Aivazovsky by Alexey Tyranov

Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky (July 29, 1817 - May 5, 1900) (Russian: Иван Константинович Айвазовский, Armenian: Հովհաննես Այվազովսկի - Hovhannes Aivazovsky July 29, 1817 - May 5, 1900) was a Russian painter of Armenian descent, most famous for his seascapes, which constitute more than half of his paintings.

Born in the town of Feodosiya, Crimea, he spent his childhood in poverty. His talent as an artist earned him sponsorship and entry to the Simpheropol gymnasium and later the St. Petersburg Academy of Arts, where he graduated with the gold medal. In 1838 he was sent to the Crimea for two years for independent study where he painted the beautiful works Seashore and Moon over Gurzuf. In 1840 he went abroad, returning only in 1844. He was accorded the title of academician and tasked with painting all the major Russian military ports on the Baltic Sea. In the 1840s during his stay in Italy Aivazovsky's painting gained its own individual style, and by 1850 his art was fully mature.

In later life, his paintings of naval scenes earned him a longstanding commission from the Russian Navy. He was also commissioned by the Ottoman Sultan to paint various artworks which are still hang in Turkish museums. His work also hangs in the most renowned museums throughout the world, including New York's Metropolitan Museum and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg.

His parents family name was Aivazian. Some of artist's paintings bear a signature, in Armenian letters, "Hovhannes Aivazian" (Russian: Ованес Айвазян).

Ivan Aivazovsky Statue in Yerevan.

With funds earned during his successful career as an artist he opened an art school and gallery in his home town of Feodosiya. Aivazovsky himself was accomplished in many areas, played the violin, was an architect, and dabbled in archeology.

Aivazovsky also spent some time working in the Caucasus, sailing to the shores of Asia, visiting Egypt during the opening of the Suez Canal and near the end of his life, in 1892, Aivazovsky even traveled to America, where he visited Washington, DC, and Niagara Falls. He has produced paintings from all of these trips, including a famous painting of Niagara Falls that hangs in his Teodosia galley.

Due to his long life in art, Aivazovsky became the most prolific Russian painter of his day and he left over 6000 works at his death in 1900. He is reputed to be a favorite among forgers.

Recently, nouveau riche Russians and Armenians (particularly Russian Armenians) have began to buy back many Russian paintings that ended up in the West after the 1917 Communist revolution, including works by Aivazovsky. In London's 2004 fall auction season several Aivazovsky works rated among the 10 highest sales of the week at both Sotheby's and Christie's. One of them "St Isaac on a frosty day" fetched a record 1.1 million pounds (2.1 million dollars or 1.6 million euros).

On May 1, 2003, a 3.5 m tall bronze statue of Ayvazovsky was unveiled near the Yerevan chamber music hall in the Armenian capital. Created by the sculptor Yuri Petrosyan, the maquette was originally the winner of a competition that took place in 1987 to create a public work, but the commission was sidelined when there was not enough money to complete the work. The 2003 monument was funded through the patronage of the President of Armenia's "Prometheus" Company Senik Gevorgian.